Friday, May 18, 2007

Douglas Adams Towel Day

No one know for certain when or what 'Towel Day" is anymore than we know why H2G2 stands for Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy, this sort of fuzzy logic seem to follow Douglas Adams career and now, that he is gone, it carries on after his death maybe even more so. So in this whimsical fashion is that May 25 has been unofficially declared "Towel Day" as a memorial to Douglas Adams. Lots of people will be celebrating that day by wearing a towel or a Hitchhiker's Guide quote on their t-shirt, I suggest you celebrate it by giving away free copies of Douglas Adams books.

Author, Douglas Adams, is best known for his trilogy: "Hitchhiker's Guide To The Galaxy", "The Restaurant at The End of The Universe", "Life, The Universe and Everything Else", "So Long, and Thanks for All The Fish", concluding with "Mostly Harmless". That is five books, you say. Good you can count. The story began on an ordinary day when Arthur Dent was mysteriously saved at the moment earth was destroyed to make way for an Intergalactic superhighway. With the help of his earth/alien friend, Ford Perfect, he began hitchhiking around the galaxy. The trilogy, which began as a BBC radio broadcast, is not your typical somber Science Fiction. British born Adams has a wacky sense of humor. You either get it or you do not and his fans get it.

Sunday, April 09, 2006

"Beware of The Leopard"

Another famous quote from The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams:

" ...You hadn't exactly gone out of your way to call attention to them had you? I mean like actually telling anyone or anything.' But the plans were on display...' o n display? I eventually had to go down to the cellar to find them.' `That's the display department.' `With a torch.' `Ah, well the lights had probably gone.' `So had the stairs.' `But look you found the notice didn't you?' `Yes,' said Arthur, `yes I did. It was on display in the bottom of a locked filing cabinet stuck in a disused lavatory with a sign on the door saying "Beware of The Leopard".' -- Douglas Adams.

Thursday, May 12, 2005


Designed by Hitchhikers fans, the Official Galactic Hitchhikers Icon is here. it depicts an earthling with a towel on his shoulder, stylized, simple and understood in any language in any planet.

Now Hitchhikers fans can recognize each other in a crowd. There you have it, finally a classy design that you can wear proudly anywhere. Stick a pin on your backpack and a sticker on your car. Hitchhiker icon is available on T-Shirts in all sizes too. It represents all of us. You can see the icon and more Hitchhikers art here HITCHHIKER'S GUIDE ICON STORE

Monday, May 09, 2005

Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy Fine Art-"The Whale"

This frame presents us with an interesting representation of the philosophical whale, depicting some fascinating secret code in the text. I am particularly proud of this posession. The whale is of course my favorite bit from the original Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy radio broadcast. You can see "The Whale" art here, as well as other related Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy art HITCHHIKER'S GUIDE Whale Art

And here is the appropiate excert from H2G2 for your enjoyment:

"Another thing that got forgotten was the fact that against all probability a sperm whale had suddenly been called into existence several miles above the surface of an alien planet.

And since this is not a naturally tenable position for a whale, this poor innocent creature had very little time to come to terms with its identity as a whale before it then had to come to terms with not being a whale any more.

This is a complete record of its thoughts from the moment it began its life till the moment it ended it.

Ah ... ! What's happening? it thought.

Er, excuse me, who am I?


Why am I here? What's my purpose in life?

What do I mean by who am I?

Calm down, get a grip now ... oh! this is an interesting sensation, what is it? It's a sort of ... yawning, tingling sensation in my ... my ... well I suppose I'd better start finding names for things if I want to make any headway in what for the sake of what I shall call an argument I shall call the world, so let's call it my stomach.

Good. Ooooh, it's getting quite strong. And hey, what's about this whistling roaring sound going past what I'm suddenly going to call my head? Perhaps I can call that ... wind! Is that a good name? It'll do ... perhaps I can find a better name for it later when I've found out what it's for. It must be something very important because there certainly seems to be a hell of a lot of it. Hey! What's this thing? This ... let's call it a tail - yeah, tail. Hey! I can can really thrash it about pretty good can't I? Wow! Wow! That feels great! Doesn't seem to achieve very much but I'll probably find out what it's for later on. Now - have I built up any coherent picture of things yet?


Never mind, hey, this is really exciting, so much to find out about, so much to look forward to, I'm quite dizzy with anticipation ...

Or is it the wind?

There really is a lot of that now isn't it?

And wow! Hey! What's this thing suddenly coming towards me very fast? Very very fast. So big and flat and round, it needs a big wide sounding name like ... ow ... ound ... round ... ground! That's it! That's a good name - ground!

I wonder if it will be friends with me?

And the rest, after a sudden wet thud, was silence.

Curiously enough, the only thing that went through the mind of the bowl of petunias as it fell was Oh no, not again. Many people have speculated that if we knew exactly why the bowl of petunias had thought that we would know a lot more about the nature of the universe than we do now. "

-Douglas Adams/The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy

Hitchikkers Guide to the Galaxy


The books are described as "a trilogy in five parts", after having been described as a trilogy on the release of the third book, and then a "trilogy in four parts" on the release of the fourth book. They have a wide following around the world, thanks to their outlandish situations, characters and concepts (eg. Babel fish, Vogon poetry, Slartibartfast and other minor characters, The Answer to Life, the Universe, and Everything), their anarchic, ironic humour, and their subtle social commentary.

The series was originally going to be called 'The Ends of the Earth' and each episode would end with the Earth being destroyed in a different way each week but this idea was scrapped and the Hitchhiker's Guide was born.

The title The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy is often abbreviated as "HHG", "HHGG", "HHGTTG" or "H2G2".

Note on spelling: Unfortunately, the different editions of the Hitchhiker's Guide spell it differently -- thus "Hitch-Hiker's Guide", "Hitch Hiker's Guide" and "Hitchhiker's Guide" are used in different editions (US or UK), versions (audio or text) and compilations of the book. For the sake of coherence, Wikipedia spells it Hitchhiker's Guide, which is reportedly the way author Adams himself preferred it.


There is a place, somewhat secret where many Hitchhikers fans go. Just click on the Earth icon to go there.

Wednesday, March 16, 2005

The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy

No matter how many times I read The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy, and I've read it quite a few times already, it never fails to thrill me and induce bouts of almost uncontrollably hearty laughter. With this novel, Douglas Adams gave life to a phenomenon that will long outlive his tragically short life, delighting millions of readers for untold years to come. I'm not sure if science fiction had ever seen anything like this before 1979. This is science fiction made to laugh at itself while honoring its rich tradition, but it is much more than that. Adams' peculiarly dead-on humor also draws deeply from the well of sociology, philosophy, and of course science. Whenever Adams encountered a sacred cow of any sort, he milked it dry before moving on. Beneath the surface of utter hilarity, Adams actually used his sarcasm and wit to make some rather poignant statements about this silly thing called life and the manner in which we are going about living it. This is one reason the book is so well-suited for multiple readings-a high level of enjoyment is guaranteed each time around, and there are always new insights to be gained from Adams' underlying, oftentimes subtle, ideas and approach.

Arthur Dent is your normal human being, and so he naturally is more concerned about his house being knocked down than facing the fact that the world is about to end. His friend Ford Prefect, he comes to learn, is actually a researcher from a planet somewhere in the vicinity of Betelgeuse, but before he can even begin to comprehend this fact, he finds himself zipped up into the confines of the Vogon space cruiser that has just destroyed the planet Earth. Things become even trickier for him when he discovers the great usefulness of sticking a Babel fish into his ear and then meets the singular President of the Galaxy Zaphod Beeblebrox and his shipmate Trillian, both of whom Arthur actually met months before at a party. Such impossible coincidences are explained by the fact that Beeblebrox's ship is powered by the new Infinite Improbability Drive. Dent grows more and more confused during his travels on board the Heart of Gold, and the story eventually culminates with an amazing visit to an astronomically improbable world.

Much of the humor here is impossible to describe; this novel must be read to be appreciated. It seems like every single line holds a joke of some kind within it. The characters are also terrific: the unfortunate Arthur Dent, who basically has no idea what is going on; Ford Prefect, Arthur's remarkable friend from Betelgeuse; Zaphod Beeblebrox, with his two heads, three arms, and cavalier attitude; Trillian the lovely Earth girl who basically flies the Heart of Gold; Slartibartfast the planet builder and fjord-make extraordinaire; and my favorite character of all, Marvin the eternally depressed robot. Life-"loathe it or ignore it, you can't like it" is the Paranoid Android's philosophy. One brilliant thing that Adams does is to step away from the action every so often to present interesting facts about the universe as recorded in the Hitchhiker's Guide; here we learn about Vogon poetry, the Ravenous Bugblatter Beast of Traal, Trans Galactic Gargle Blasters, and other fascinating tidbits about life in the crazy universe Adams created. He even gives the reader the ultimate answer to the question of Life, the Universe, and Everything in these pages.

This novel is just an amazingly hilarious read that will leave you yearning for more; to our great fortune, Adams indeed left us more in the form of four subsequent books in the Hitchhiker's "trilogy." If you don't like science fiction, it doesn't matter; read this book just for the laughs. The most amazing thing about Adams' humor is the fact that everyone seems to "get" it. Adams broke all the rules in writing a novel quite unlike any that had come before it, and he succeeded in spades. This may well be the funniest novel ever written.